Midlands PASS February 2016 Meeting

Midlands PASS has changed its meetings from the 2nd Thursday to the 2nd Tuesday of each month. This takes effect with this month’s meeting. We are still meeting at the same location in West Columbia, SC. However, the name of the organization has changed: Microstaff IT has become We Know IT!

For this month’s meeting on February 9th we are looking at improving queries. Here’s the abstract:

We want queries to run fast. The faster queries run, the less likely they are to get in the way of other queries (blocking). The faster queries run, the less likely they are to collide where one will have to be rolled back (deadlocking). And the faster queries run, the more queries we can pump through the system, thereby improving performance. In this presentation we’ll look at how the SQL Server query engine works: how it breaks down a query, how it uses indexes, and how it puts all this together to produce an execution plan. By understanding how the engine works, we’ll understand how to improve our queries.

If you can make it out, please RSVP so we’ll know how many refreshments to bring.

Midlands PASS Meeting: 2016 SQL Server Security Refresher

The Midlands PASS Chapter will hold its next meeting on January 14, 2016 at Microstaff IT. We start the meet and greet at 5:30 PM and the main topic usually kicks off around 6 PM.

2016 SQL Server Security Refresher

Midlands PASS Chapter’s annual SQL Server security refresher! This is an open-ended discussing hosted by Data Platform MVP and resident SQL Server security expert, Brian Kelley. Bring your scenarios and questions and we’ll work through the best ways to build security solutions for and using Microsoft SQL Server.

You can RSVP here so we know how much food and refreshments to bring.

Getting the Degree and Debt

Yesterday I said to just get the four year degree. It’s a checklist item and I’ve had several folks comment about how it is a limiting factor in job searches.

One of my friends asked an important question: should you go into debt to get that four year degree?

My initial thought is, “No.” If you’re already gainfully employed, not having the degree isn’t worth going into debt over. Avoiding debt is generally a good idea, as espoused in sites like Mr. Money Moustache. Stop and think about the fact that we’re complaining about crippling student loan debt here in the United States. Debt and having to pay interest on that debt hurts.

But what if your company reimburses? Should you put the course(s) on your credit card or get a second mortgage? The problem with depending on the reimbursement is it might not be there at the end or you may choose not to take the reimbursement. There’s a whole host of reasons why that I won’t get into here. So if it’s not there, you’re stuck with that debt. Better to save up and have the money to pay up front for the hours and if you can and choose to get the reimbursement, you’re in the clear (and can use that money to help with the next round of courses).

Get the Degree

Fake diplomaRecently, a friend of mine with a lot of experience in her field was back on the job search. She is good at what she does, the local community (related to IT) knows she is a senior-level professional, but there was one big problem: she didn’t have a four year degree. As a result, there were some folks who wanted to hire her but couldn’t get past the mandatory HR checklist. She has a good job now, but her job search took longer than it should have because of that degree requirement. And it wasn’t that she didn’t have a degree at all. She had a two year degree. But the HR checklists all said, “Bachelor’s degree.”

I’ve asked a few other friends who don’t have four year degrees and their experience has been the same. Yes, they’ll eventually land a great job, but they’ve been turned down for opportunities because they don’t have a bachelor’s level degree. Keep in mind that rarely does the subject of the degree matter. I happen to have two technically related degrees: B.A. Mathematics and B.S. Physics. I don’t have a computer science degree. That has never come up as an issue. The fact that I have the four year degree is enough to check the check box and continue on. I know others who have a degree in music, in public administration, in elementary school education, and in other fields that aren’t “cousins” with computers. The subject hasn’t mattered. The fact that they had a four year degree did.

When it comes to who I work with, I don’t care if you have a degree. I care about whether or not you can do the job. Most IT pros I know feel the same way. However, we’re not the entry point in the hiring process. As a result, my perspective has changed on whether or not to get a degree. Before, I was of the opinion that if it’s meaningful to you, if you want to go into management, etc., then go ahead and get the degree. However, given my friend’s case, my opinion has changed to recommend folks get the four year degree, period.

The degree isn’t just about having better prospects on the job market. I know of specific cases where not having a degree meant a lower salary for excellent professionals, even architecture-caliber folks. Even if you’re gainfully employed now, you could be leaving money on the table by not having a four year degree. Yes, in my opinion this is unfair, but it’s the reality in a lot of organizations.

So should you try and get a computer science degree if you’re in the IT field? You’ll certainly pick up things you likely won’t come across in day-to-day work but which could influence things if you knew about them (like O(n) notation and algorithm analysis). However, whether or not you have a bachelor’s degree, any bachelor’s degree, is what is on the checklist the vast majority of the time. Therefore, get a degree in what you’re interested in (and what work will pay for, if you have that option and choose to take it), and get it done as quickly as possible. Simply get the checklist item out of the way. Hopefully, you’ll have fun and learn some interesting things along the way, but the main thing is to get the degree.

SQL Server Encryption Presentation on July 9, 2015

I will be giving a presentation on SQL Server Encryption through MSSQLTips. It’s at 3 PM EDT on July 9, 2015.

You can register through the MSSQLTips.com page for the webinar.

This sign-up page will allow you to sign up for multiple future webinars.

A rough outline of the presentation:

Data in the Database

  • The case for partial encryption (some data unencrypted)
  • The datatypes we use for encrypted data
  • The options available and who can see decrypted data
  • How we use SQL Server’s built-in functionality
  • Addressing Performance Issues

Encrypting the Whole Database (Transparent Data Encryption)

  • How it works
  • What you need to make it work
  • How do you handle recovery / disaster recovery

Encrypting Backups

  • Don’t wait until after it’s written to disk
  • TDE to the rescue
  • Encrypted backups in SQL Server 2014
  • Don’t reject 3rd party products

Encrypting Connections to SQL Server

  • The options
  • What about POODLE?
  • What about IPSEC?

On Software and OS Lifecycle Management

An Important Rule: 

If you’re trying to convince someone to your viewpoint, insulting them generally doesn’t work. If it does anything, it will be more likely to entrench them against your position. Therefore, this is something that IT professionals should avoid. 

If You Write Your Own Software

or work for an organization that’s core business runs on the software your organization writes, it is easy to miss the issues that folks who typically deploy third party solutions face. Among them is what the vendor will support with regards to operating system, core application components, etc. For instance, an IT pro may be perfectly ready to roll a Windows Server 2012 VM for a new application deployment. However, the vendor doesn’t support beyond Windows Server 2008 R2. Guess what the IT pro is going to deploy? In the vast majority of cases, that server is going to be Windows Server 2008 R2.

As a young IT pro, I often thought, “Hey, I can convince the vendor to support my configuration.” What I quickly learned, however, was quite different. As The Rock says,

“It doesn’t matter what you think!”

If you have to run a particular software package and they have requirements you don’t like, most of the time you have to accept your dislike and conform to the vendor.

When New Features Trump Maintenance

Being a security type, I always want the most streamlined, secure operating system and/or application. However, taking the time to upgrade takes away from time to implement new features unless the new features desired are in the operating system or application that is in need of an upgrade. If the new features come as a result of development or another application, you may not get the option of upgrading when you want. This is especially true when you support a lot of core applications and when business is constantly looking for new features and values new features over maintaining existing systems (even though replacement or fixes or upgrades will be substantially more at a later time). 

Trying to fight this in some organizations is fruitless. The organization will perform the upgrade (or migration to a new OS baseline) when they are forced to dos o. In this case, a bit more wisdom from The Rock,

“Know your role!”

TL;DR Version

We don’t always get to pick when we upgrade OS or application version. There are other factors in play. Don’t assume that one professional’s seeming lack of desire to do so is because of any particular reason. The only way to know is to ask, and to do nicely, without insulting said professional.

On PowerShell

I use PowerShell a lot and I write about using it to solve problems quite frequently. The fact that I can extending Powershell by interfacing with the .NET Framework or making a COM/COM+ object call means I can do just about anything I need to do in order to manage a Windows system. As a result, I consider PowerShell one of my most powerful tools.

However (you knew there was going to be a however), PowerShell is one tool among many. If you are a smart IT pro, you build your toolbox with the tools that are most appropriate for you. Yes, you take into account where the industry is as well as what your current job(s)/client(s) use. Sometimes that means you choose a tool other than PowerShell. To some, though, that sounds of blasphemy. It shouldn’t be. If you’re a senior IT professional, you should be amenable to finding the right tool for the job, even if it’s not the one you like the most. If you’re at an architect level, you had better be prepared to recommend a technology that is the best fit, not the best liked (by you).

When I think in these terms, it means I don’t build Windows system administration tools with Perl any longer. Unfortunately, even though ActiveState still has a very functional version, Perl has faded greatly from view on the Windows side. Granted, it was never very bright, but there were some big name proponents and it gave a whole lot of functionality not available in VBscript/Cscript/Jscript. That’s why some enterprise shops turned to it. With PowerShell, the functionality provided by Perl on Windows systems, the functionality missing from earlier Microsoft scripting languages, is present. So PowerShell will usually make more sense.

I said usually. I don’t automatically select PowerShell because it is the recommended standard by Microsoft. What clients am I running on? What other languages am I using? For instance, if I’m a heavy Python shop, that can be used to manage Windows systems. It may be more cost effective to write in Python than in PowerShell. If I have linux and Mac OS X platforms, I’m likely not using PowerShell. It’s all about the right tool for the job. And the right tool has more considerations than what a particular company recommends.

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