Speaking at Charlotte BI Group Tomorrow

Tomorrow, Tuesday, April 7, 2015, I’ll be speaking at the Charlotte BI user group. The meeting starts at 5:30 PM.

Here’s the info:

RSVP Link

Topic: Securing the ETL Pipeline

We’re going to look at typical ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) pipelines and consider the weak points an attacker might go after. Our goal in this isn’t to cause FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt), but to discuss risks at each point, options for protecting the vulnerability, and what we’ve seen typically done (if anything). While this talk primarily focuses on Microsoft SQL Server, especially the database engine and SSIS, many of the points covered will be applicable to any solution set.

Location: 8055 Microsoft Way, Charlotte NC 28273

Speaking at Midlands PASS Chapter tonight

The Midlands PASS Chapter is an official PASS (Professional Association for SQL Server) chapter located in Columbia, SC. It’s free to attend our meetings, which are typically held the 2nd Thursday of each month.

Once a year we like to do an open forum on SQL Server security. It’s typically held in February, but was postponed due to the inclement weather. Therefore, we’re holding the open forum tonight, March 13, 2014, from 5:30 to 7:00 PM. The first part of every meeting is meet and greet to give folks time to network. Then we settle in for a presentation, or in this case, a forum discussion.

The SQL Server security open forum is as it sounds: folks are free to bring up whatever they want to with regards to SQL Server security and as a community we’ll try to take things apart and come up with the best answer. While I may focus on SQL Server security, I don’t have all the answers. None of us do. That’s why a few years ago we went to this more free form discussion.

If you’re in the area and would like to attend, please drop on by. We meet at Microstaff IT in Cayce, SC at 440 Knox Abbot Drive (tower with Bank of America logo on the top). If you look on Google Maps, the address is marked wrong. Google Maps is pointing at the shopping center right next to the tower, but the parking lots are connected.

The weakest link in database security

The weakest link in database security is the same as for most all IT security: people.

Because the weakest link is always people, we have adopted a principle called The Principle of Least Privilege to determine how we should assign security. If you’ve never heard of it, it’s a basic concept with some easy to follow rules:

  1. Give enough rights to do the job.
  2. Don’t give any more.
  3. Don’t give any less.

#2 is particularly relevant. It’s easy to violate this, especially when SQL Server is concerned. If you’ve ever heard, “Just give the application db_datareader,” you’ve heard a violation of this principle. The same is true with db_datawriter. Why is this a violation? Let’s ask a few basic questions.

  • Does the application (report / user / etc.) need access to all tables in the database?
  • Does the application (report / user / etc.) need access to all view in the database?
  • Are you sure the application (report / user /etc.) needs access to the catalog views (the system objects) for the database?

Often times, the risk is understated: “Well, so-and-so is completely safe. He would never do anything wrong with the data.” Yes, that particular person may be safe. Then again, life changes may alter that person’s morals and ethics. It’s amazing how much major events like a divorce, like medical bills, like gambling debts, like a new drug habit change those things. But let’s say the person is completely safe. Are you safe? No.

The problem isn’t the person. It’s the person’s user account. If someone were able to run under the context of the user account, he or she can do whatever the account can do. Give the account too many privileges and you’ve got a problem. If someone is willing to compromise an account, they are likely going to have few qualms about swiping important data.

See, it’s relatively hard to directly attack a database server and in a trusted environment. It’s much easier to slip a trojan in to an email or mail a link which leads to the malware being installed on the user’s computer. And then, BAM!, the attacker is in as that user and the attacker now has the user’s access to the database. If you’ve given too much access, that’s bad.

Therefore, given the weakest link in database security, the best practice is to follow The Principle of Least Privilege. Don’t leave it until the end and try to retrofit. You’ll likely be forced to rush and that’s when people cut corners with db_datareader and db_datawriter. Instead, get it attacked at the start of a project / development effort. Get it right from the beginning.