Get the Degree

Fake diplomaRecently, a friend of mine with a lot of experience in her field was back on the job search. She is good at what she does, the local community (related to IT) knows she is a senior-level professional, but there was one big problem: she didn’t have a four year degree. As a result, there were some folks who wanted to hire her but couldn’t get past the mandatory HR checklist. She has a good job now, but her job search took longer than it should have because of that degree requirement. And it wasn’t that she didn’t have a degree at all. She had a two year degree. But the HR checklists all said, “Bachelor’s degree.”

I’ve asked a few other friends who don’t have four year degrees and their experience has been the same. Yes, they’ll eventually land a great job, but they’ve been turned down for opportunities because they don’t have a bachelor’s level degree. Keep in mind that rarely does the subject of the degree matter. I happen to have two technically related degrees: B.A. Mathematics and B.S. Physics. I don’t have a computer science degree. That has never come up as an issue. The fact that I have the four year degree is enough to check the check box and continue on. I know others who have a degree in music, in public administration, in elementary school education, and in other fields that aren’t “cousins” with computers. The subject hasn’t mattered. The fact that they had a four year degree did.

When it comes to who I work with, I don’t care if you have a degree. I care about whether or not you can do the job. Most IT pros I know feel the same way. However, we’re not the entry point in the hiring process. As a result, my perspective has changed on whether or not to get a degree. Before, I was of the opinion that if it’s meaningful to you, if you want to go into management, etc., then go ahead and get the degree. However, given my friend’s case, my opinion has changed to recommend folks get the four year degree, period.

The degree isn’t just about having better prospects on the job market. I know of specific cases where not having a degree meant a lower salary for excellent professionals, even architecture-caliber folks. Even if you’re gainfully employed now, you could be leaving money on the table by not having a four year degree. Yes, in my opinion this is unfair, but it’s the reality in a lot of organizations.

So should you try and get a computer science degree if you’re in the IT field? You’ll certainly pick up things you likely won’t come across in day-to-day work but which could influence things if you knew about them (like O(n) notation and algorithm analysis). However, whether or not you have a bachelor’s degree, any bachelor’s degree, is what is on the checklist the vast majority of the time. Therefore, get a degree in what you’re interested in (and what work will pay for, if you have that option and choose to take it), and get it done as quickly as possible. Simply get the checklist item out of the way. Hopefully, you’ll have fun and learn some interesting things along the way, but the main thing is to get the degree.

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Allen White
    Aug 25, 2015 @ 11:53:41

    Hi Brian,

    It was for this same reason I went back and got my bachelor’s degree (yes, in Computer Information Systems) in my early 50s. I was 54 when I finally graduated, and by that time a SQL Server MVP, but without it opportunities were limited with some companies. One can argue that those are companies that you wouldn’t want to work with, but I just started at one of the best companies in the SQL Server space, and a Bachelor’s Degree was one of the requirements for the job. Would they have overlooked that in my case? Probably, but it might have made other candidates more interesting to them.

    Reply

  2. Trackback: Getting the Degree and Debt | Databases - Infrastructure - Security

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